What is the paradox in the poem on being brought from Africa to America?

Paradox in the first stanza: Phillis described her enslavement as a means of her salvation. Thus, she was brought to America so that her soul could be saved. Those who enslaved her, saved her.

What is the paradox in on being brought from Africa to America?

This duality in language (literal and figurative) embodies the paradox of Wheatley’s poem. Sometimes it sounds like she’s putting her race down, saying that being black or dark is bad. And sometimes, those images of darkness are meant to be read as a religious, moral, and spiritual darkness.

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What does Wheatley says brought her from Africa to America?

Poem Summary

In line one, the speaker says that it was great luck that she was brought from Africa (the ‘Pagan land’) to America. In lines two through four, she says that coming to America introduced her to Christianity, which has brought her peace and salvation that she didn’t even know she needed.

What rhetorical devices are used in On Being Brought from Africa to America?

Wheatley makes use of several literary devices in ‘On Being Brought from Africa to America’. These include but are not limited to personification, allusion, and alliteration. The first, personification, is seen in the first lines in which the poet says it was “mercy” that brought her to America.

What is the purpose of On Being Brought from Africa to America?

As the first African American woman to publish a book of poetry, Wheatley uses this poem to argue that all people, regardless of race, are capable of finding salvation through Christianity.

How does Wheatley use sarcasm in her poem on being brought from Africa to America?

In her poem “On Being Brought from Africa to America” she addresses her audience to the matter of race. As previously mentioned, people view this poem as being sarcastic to its readers. … She reminds her readers that through Christianity everyone is viewed the same no matter what color, gender, or age they were.

What does the speaker of the poem mean when she refers to my pagan land?

There’s a little narrative in her poem though, when the speaker writes, “brought me from my Pagan land.” So, the speaker is a slave that was brought from Africa to America—by “mercy.” And it’s mercy that converts the speaker to Christianity, which she knew nothing about in Africa.

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What does the Colour is a diabolic die mean?

diabolic. showing cunning or ingenuity or wickedness. “Their colour is a diabolic die.”

What does Twas mercy brought me from my pagan land?

Remember, she feels like mercy was a gift that allowed her to be brought from her “Pagan” land to the knowledge of God. The last line of her couplet is referring to a time before the speaker was changed.

What lesson from the Bible does Wheatley say she has learned?

What lesson from the Bible does Wheatley say she has learned? There is a Christian God and Savior.

What does Refin D mean?

“Refin’d” is an interesting word choice, too. If we dig a little deeper, “free of impurities” can imply God’s colorblindness to offering salvation.

Who is Wheatley’s audience?

Wheatley went to London in 1773 to recuperate from tuberculosis, most likely contracted on the slave ship where contagious diseases were rampant. In London, she found an audience in high English nobility, including the Countess of Huntingdon, Selina Hastings.

Who is Phillis Wheatley audience on being brought from Africa to America?

Wheatley admits this, and in one move, the balance of the poem seems shattered. She separates herself from the audience of white readers as a black person, calling attention to the difference. She thus makes clear that she has praised God rather than the people or country of America for her good fortune.

What is the pagan land?

anjumonsahin. 5.0. The pagan land referred to is Africa. The answer is to be found towards the end of the poem in line number 7, when the speaker says, “Remember, Christians, Negros, black as Cain…”

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Who is the speaker of the poem on being brought from Africa to America?

We can never assume the speaker is the same person as the poet, but since the title of this poem is about being taken from Africa to America, and we know Phillis Wheatley was taken from Africa to America, we can at least guess that this poem is somewhat autobiographical.

What is the speaker’s attitude toward being brought from Africa to America Support your answer with evidence from the poem?

What is the speaker’s attitude toward having been brought from Africa to America? She is primarily grateful.

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