Ofori-Atta Ego-Bombs at IMF Sells his businesses to international investors on a supposed trip to market the country

Finance Minister, Ken Ofori-Atta, continues to give the impression that he is in office to use the Finance Ministry as launch pad to catapult his personal businesses into more profitability.

Even as his sale of a scandalous $2.25billion bond to his business partner’s company remains unresolved, Mr. Ofori-Atta has leveraged the platform of a global forum that the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank have provided for countries to sell his businesses.

At the expense of Ghana, the Finance Minister in April, this year, went to hype up Data Bank and the infamous Enterprise Insurance at this year’s edition of the IMF/World Bank Spring meetings in Washington DC.

Indirectly assuring investors that their investments into his brand would be safe, Mr. Ofori-Atta also touted his expensive education at the Columbia University and Yale, and his experience from Wall Street.

“From there to Achimota School, one of the best schools in Ghana, then to Columbia, to Yale, to Wall Street, back to Ghana, set up an investment bank and insurance firm, and then joined the political train and I’m Finance Minister.”

Ken Ofori-Atta had taken the course that has since been seen as self- aggrandizement and personal investment fishing, after he had been invited in his capacity as Ghana’s Finance Minister to speak to the impact that Ghana’s three-year program with the IMF was having on the country.

However, upon being granted audience at that IMF program, the Finance Minister rather saw it fit to speak to an entirely different topic that was irrelevant and immaterial to the issues about the IMF’s program with Ghana.

He touted that he is a Yale and Colombia educated been-to with an Achimotan background who has built Data Bank and Enterprise Insurance.

And the touting was just one aspect of an embarrassing narcissism that Ken Ofori-Atta displayed at the program to drag Ghana along with himself into memorialized embarrassment that was caught on camera.

In an embarrassing footage that gives the impression that Ghana is a country of jokers, our Finance Minister, is captured announcing in Washington DC that he is a spawn of borrowed sex, born out of wedlock and was a bastard for 11 years before his runaway father came to his senses.

The audience that Mr. Ofori-Atta had made the revelation to included the president of the International Monetary Fund, Christine Lagarde, and the president of the World Bank, Jim Yong Kim.

“I was born out of wedlock, and therefore my mother was supposed to abort, and she ran away and I survived. So I didn’t know my father until I was about 10, 11…”

The shocking disclosure, which was made by the Finance Minister, happened at an African Consultative Group Meeting held in Washington DC, in April, this year, as part of the IMF/World Bank Spring meetings.

What is even more embarrassing is that, in addition to the inappropriateness of the platform, the revelations had been totally uncalled for at a forum that was discussing economics and monetary policies.

A host of the programme had called Ghana’s Finance Minister from among an audience that was made up world economic and financial experts to speak to the importance of the forum to Ghana at a time that the country was having a three-year programme with the IMF.

With expectation for eloquent advancement of arguments by the Finance Minister, who had gone there as part of Ghana’s delegation that included Bank of Ghana Governor, Dr. Ernest Addison, and led by Vice President, Mahamudu Bawumia, the audience had clapped for Ofori-Atta.

However, rather than speak the numbers language, the Finance Minister launched into an abortion and illicit sex story about himself that left Ghana looking like a clown-state for having such a man for Finance Minister.

The shocking awkwardness had started with a host of the programme courteously breaking up a panel discussion to invite comments from Ghana’s Finance Minister.

“Minister Ofori-Atta from Ghana because am sure you are happy to see Madam Lagarde here in the panel. Your country has a three-year facility with the IMF and of course Ghana was dependent on oil, on cocoa, and on gold, but it has had some troubles there. What are your expectations from the compact process in getting your economy back on track?” The host had asked.

Upon the question to him, Ken Ofori-Atta stood up and picked the microphone, and the rest was the embarrassing shock.

“Thank you very much and thank you from Germany for all that you are doing. Thank you panelists. It’s good to be here and to join this rather unique group of five countries.

“Erm… you know, let me tell you a story, you can’t come to Africa and not hear a story.

“And so, for example, I was born out of wedlock, and therefore my mother was supposed to abort and she ran away and I survived. So I didn’t know my father until I was about 10-11 and she came back with a PhD and decided that you should move from the village to live with him, which changed the course of my history.

“So the strength of a woman not to abort was critical. And then the sense of responsibility after not knowing him to decide that you should move from the village and come and stay with him in Legon and begin to even learn how to spell your name as Ken was important. What I have therefore is from there to Achimota School, one of the best schools in Ghana, then to Columbia, to Yale, to Wall Street, back to Ghana, set up an investment bank and insurance firm, and then joined the political train and I’m Finance Minister.

“So my question then, for all of us, is: where do we feel responsible for the unique situation of each country? So we inherited a very difficult situation when we came to power… 8.9 deficit, primary balance, -72% debt to GDP ratio and a 1billion facility to help us. I mean clearly, with what we have done in these five months is a different energy and spirit and it’s a spirit that can take us extremely far.

“My question in this land, as we talk, is who are going to be the Jon Banaires, who are going to say we are not going to get weary? We gonna keep at it, we gonna look at it differently and create in these seven countries a satellite of radiation that will permeate the continent…”

Ken Ofori-Atta blabbered on and on, but never managed to navigate into answering the substantive question as to how the meetings with the IMF are impacting Ghana’s three-year programme with the financial body.

The awkward scenario left Ghana looking like a total joke for a state, for having a Finance Minister who sees it fit to tell abortion stories on the world economic stage.

A video of the awkward scene has started trending on social media.

 

 

 

Source: therepublicnewsonline.com/ Fiifi Samuels

 

The Republic News Online

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